Tag: java

Questions Related to java

Overriding and Overloading is for ?

  1. Methods and variables

  2. class

  3. variables

  4. Methods


Correct Option: D
Explanation:

To answer this question, the user needs to know the basic concepts of object-oriented programming (OOP) and the differences between method overriding and method overloading.

Option A: Methods and variables - This option is partially correct. Overriding and overloading both apply to methods in OOP, not to variables. Therefore, this option is only correct for the first part of the question.

Option B: Class - This option is not correct. Overriding and overloading are not for classes, but for methods within classes.

Option C: Variables - This option is not correct. Overriding and overloading are not for variables, but for methods within classes.

Option D: Methods - This option is correct. Overriding and overloading are techniques used for methods in OOP. Method overriding means providing a new implementation of a method in a subclass that is already defined in its superclass. Method overloading means defining multiple methods with the same name in the same class, but with different parameters.

Therefore, the correct answer is:

The answer is: D. Methods

  1. class, if, void, long, Int, continue

  2. goto, instanceof, native, finally, default, throws

  3. try, virtual, throw, final, volatile, transient

  4. strictfp, constant, super, implements, do


Correct Option: B
Explanation:

All the words in option B are among the 49 Java keywords. Although goto reserved as a keyword in Java, goto is not used and has no function.Option A is wrong because the keyword for the primitive int starts with a lowercase i.Option C is wrong because "vi

Which will legally declare, construct, and initialize an array?

  1. int [] myList = {"1", "2", "3"};

  2. int [] myList = (5, 8, 2);

  3. int myList [] [] = {4,9,7,0};

  4. int myList [] = {4, 3, 7};


Correct Option: D
Explanation:

To legally declare, construct, and initialize an array, the user needs to know the syntax of creating an array and how to initialize it with values.

Option A is incorrect because it uses double quotes for the array initialization, which is used for string values. For integer values, we don't need to use quotes.

Option B is incorrect because it uses parentheses instead of curly brackets for array initialization.

Option C is incorrect because it declares a two-dimensional array but only initializes with one-dimensional values.

Option D is correct because it declares, constructs, and initializes a one-dimensional integer array with the values 4, 3, and 7.

Therefore, the answer is:

The Answer is: D

  1. method

  2. native

  3. subclasses

  4. reference


Correct Option: B
  1. interface

  2. string

  3. Float

  4. unsigned


Correct Option: A
  1. Array a = new Array(5);

  2. int [] a = {23,22,21,20,19};

  3. int a [] = new int[5];

  4. int [5] array;


Correct Option: B
Explanation:

To declare an array and initialize it with five numbers, the user needs to know the syntax for declaring and initializing an array in Java.

Option A is incorrect because the Array class does not have a constructor that takes an integer as an argument, and thus this statement will not create an array of five elements.

Option B is correct because it initializes an integer array a with 5 elements and assigns the values 23, 22, 21, 20, and 19 to the array.

Option C is also correct because it declares an integer array a with 5 elements, but it does not initialize the array with any values.

Option D is incorrect because the syntax int [5] array is not valid in Java. The correct syntax should be int[] array = new int[5] which creates an integer array array with 5 elements and initializes all elements to 0.

Therefore, the correct answer is:

The Answer is: B. int [] a = {23,22,21,20,19};

  1. public double methoda();

  2. public final double methoda();

  3. static void methoda(double d1);

  4. protected void methoda(double d1);


Correct Option: A
Explanation:

To solve this question, the user needs to understand the syntax and rules for declaring methods within an interface in Java.

In Java, an interface is a collection of abstract methods, which means the methods declared within an interface do not have a body. The purpose of an interface is to define a contract that classes can implement, specifying the methods they must provide.

Now, let's go through each option and explain why it is right or wrong:

A. public double methoda(); This option is a valid declaration within an interface definition. It declares a public method named "methoda" that returns a double value. Since interfaces only contain abstract methods, there is no need to provide a method body.

B. public final double methoda(); This option is not a valid declaration within an interface definition. The "final" keyword cannot be used to modify a method declaration within an interface. The "final" keyword is used to indicate that a method cannot be overridden by a subclass.

C. static void methoda(double d1); This option is not a valid declaration within an interface definition. The "static" keyword cannot be used to modify a method declaration within an interface. Static methods belong to the class itself, not an instance of the class.

D. protected void methoda(double d1); This option is not a valid declaration within an interface definition. The "protected" keyword cannot be used to modify a method declaration within an interface. Protected methods are accessible within the same package and by subclasses.

Therefore, the valid declaration within an interface definition is:

The Answer is: A. public double methoda();

  1. boolean b1 = 0;

  2. boolean b2 = 'false';

  3. boolean b3 = false;

  4. boolean b4 = Boolean.false();


Correct Option: C
Explanation:

A boolean can only be assigned the literal true or false.

  1. String s1 = null;

  2. String s2 = 'null';

  3. String s3 = (String) 'abc';

  4. String s4 = (String) '\ufeed';


Correct Option: A
Explanation:

To solve this question, the user needs to understand the syntax and rules for declaring a String in Java.

Let's go through each option and explain why it is right or wrong:

A. String s1 = null; This option is a valid declaration of a String. In Java, a String variable can be assigned a null value, which means it does not reference any object. This option is correct.

B. String s2 = 'null'; This option is incorrect. In Java, single quotes (' ') are used to represent characters, not Strings. To declare a String, double quotes (" ") should be used. Therefore, this option is wrong.

C. String s3 = (String) 'abc'; This option is incorrect. In Java, to declare a String, the value must be enclosed in double quotes (" "). The syntax (String) is used for type casting, which is not necessary when declaring a String. Therefore, this option is wrong.

D. String s4 = (String) '\ufeed'; This option is incorrect. The value '\ufeed' is an escape sequence representing a Unicode character. However, to declare a String, the value must be enclosed in double quotes (" "). Therefore, this option is wrong.

The Answer is: A. String s1 = null;

What is the numerical range of a char?

  1. -128 to 127

  2. -(215) to (215) - 1

  3. 0 to 32767

  4. 0 to 65535


Correct Option: D

AI Explanation

To answer this question, we need to understand the numerical range of a char data type in programming.

In most programming languages, including Java and C++, a char data type represents a single character and is stored as a 16-bit value.

The correct answer is D) 0 to 65535. This is because a char data type can store values between 0 and 65535, inclusive. The range starts from 0 because it represents the Unicode value for the character '0', and it goes up to 65535 because it represents the maximum Unicode value that can be stored in a char.

Option A) -128 to 127 is incorrect because this range corresponds to the numerical range of a byte data type, which is 8 bits in size.

Option B) -(2^15) to (2^15) - 1 is incorrect because this range corresponds to the numerical range of a short data type, which is 16 bits in size.

Option C) 0 to 32767 is incorrect because this range corresponds to the numerical range of an int data type, which is typically 32 bits in size.

Therefore, the correct answer is D) 0 to 65535.