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programming languages Online Quiz - 27

Description: programming languages Online Quiz - 27
Number of Questions: 20
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Tags: programming languages
Attempted 0/20 Correct 0 Score 0

Default layout for frame

  1. Flow Layout

  2. GridLayout

  3. Card Layout

  4. BorderLayout

  5. GridBagLayout


Correct Option: D

Check whether the syntax of the piece of code is correct: text.setBackGround(color.Yellow);

  1. True

  2. False


Correct Option: B
  1. f == EOF

  2. feof( f )

  3. eof( f )

  4. f == NULL


Correct Option: A
Explanation:

To determine if the end of a file has been reached, we need to check the return value of the read operation. In the given code, the file is opened using fopen and then readData is called to read from the file. After that, we need to check if the end of the file has been reached.

Option A) f == EOF - This option is correct because it checks if the file pointer f is equal to the constant EOF (End of File). If the end of the file has been reached, the read operation will return EOF, and this condition will evaluate to true.

Option B) feof(f) - This option is incorrect. The feof function is used to check if the end-of-file indicator is set for the given file stream. It does not directly indicate if the end of the file has been reached after a read operation.

Option C) eof(f) - This option is incorrect. The eof function is not a standard function in C. It is not used to check if the end of a file has been reached.

Option D) f == NULL - This option is incorrect. The f pointer is obtained from fopen and is checked for NULL to ensure that the file was successfully opened. It does not indicate if the end of the file has been reached.

The correct answer is Option A) f == EOF. This option correctly checks if the end of the file has been reached after a read operation.

Therefore, the correct answer is Option A.

Which one of the following statements allocates enough space to hold an array of 10 integers that are initialized to 0?

  1. int *ptr = (int *) malloc(10, sizeof(int));

  2. int *ptr = (int *) calloc(10, sizeof(int));

  3. int *ptr = (int *) malloc(10*sizeof(int));

  4. int *ptr = (int *) alloc(10*sizeof(int));


Correct Option: C

AI Explanation

To answer this question, you need to understand memory allocation in C.

Let's go through each option to understand why it is correct or incorrect:

Option A) int *ptr = (int *) malloc(10, sizeof(int)); This option is incorrect because the malloc function takes only one argument, which is the number of bytes to allocate. The correct syntax would be malloc(10*sizeof(int)) instead of malloc(10, sizeof(int)).

Option B) int *ptr = (int *) calloc(10, sizeof(int)); This option is correct. The calloc function allocates memory for an array of elements and initializes them to zero. It takes two arguments: the number of elements to allocate and the size of each element. In this case, calloc(10, sizeof(int)) allocates enough space for 10 integers and initializes them to 0.

Option C) int *ptr = (int *) malloc(10*sizeof(int)); This option is correct. The malloc function allocates memory for an array of elements without initializing them. It takes one argument: the number of bytes to allocate. In this case, malloc(10*sizeof(int)) allocates enough space for 10 integers.

Option D) int *ptr = (int *) alloc(10*sizeof(int)); This option is incorrect because there is no standard function called alloc() in C. The correct function to use for memory allocation is malloc().

The correct answer is Option C. This option allocates enough space to hold an array of 10 integers that are initialized to 0.

  1. char ** (* p) [12][12] = array;

  2. char ***** p = array;

  3. char * (* p) [12][12][12] = array;

  4. const char ** p [12][12][12] = array;


Correct Option: A
Explanation:

To solve this question, the user needs to be familiar with C/C++ syntax and the concept of pointers.

A. char ** (* p) [12][12] = array;

This option is valid. p is a pointer to a 3D array of char pointers. It is initialized to point to the first element of the array using the assignment operator =.

B. char ***** p = array;

This option is not valid. p is a pointer to a pointer to a pointer to a pointer to a pointer to a char, which is not compatible with the type of array.

C. char * (* p) [12][12][12] = array;

This option is not valid. p is a pointer to a 4D array of char pointers, which is not compatible with the type of array.

D. const char ** p [12][12][12] = array;

This option is not valid. p is a 3D array of const char pointers, which is not compatible with the type of array.

Therefore, the only valid option is:

The Answer is: A

Code: char *ptr; char myString[] = "abcdefg"; ptr = myString; ptr += 5; What string does ptr point to in the sample code above?

  1. efg

  2. cdefg

  3. fg

  4. None of the above


Correct Option: C
Explanation:

To solve this question, the user needs to understand the concept of pointers in C programming. In this case, ptr is a pointer variable that points to the first character of the myString array. The statement ptr += 5 increments the pointer by 5, so that it now points to the sixth character in the array.

Option A is incorrect because ptr is pointing to the sixth character in the array, not the third.

Option B is incorrect because ptr is pointing to the sixth character in the array, not the first.

Option C is correct because ptr is pointing to the sixth character in the array, which is "f", and continues to the end of the string, "g". Therefore, the string that ptr points to is "fg".

Option D is incorrect because an answer was provided above.

Therefore, the answer is: C. fg

  1. -400

  2. .004

  3. -4000

  4. .0004


Correct Option: C
Explanation:

To solve this question, the user needs to know the concept of scientific notation. In scientific notation, a number is expressed as the product of a coefficient and a power of 10. The coefficient is a number between 1 and 10, and the power of 10 represents the number of places the decimal point must be moved to obtain the original number.

The notation -4e3 means -4 times 10 to the power of 3, or -4 multiplied by 1000. This gives us -4000.

Now, let's go through each option and explain why it is right or wrong:

A. -400: This option is incorrect because -400 is not equal to -4e3. A negative exponent in scientific notation represents a number less than 1, so -4e3 is a negative number with a large absolute value.

B. .004: This option is incorrect because .004 is not equal to -4e3. A positive exponent in scientific notation represents a large number, so -4e3 is a negative number with a large absolute value.

C. -4000: This option is correct. As explained earlier, -4e3 means -4 times 10 to the power of 3, or -4 multiplied by 1000. This gives us -4000.

D. .0004: This option is incorrect because .0004 is not equal to -4e3. A positive exponent in scientific notation represents a large number, so -4e3 is a negative number with a large absolute value.

Therefore, the answer is:

The Answer is: C

Which one of the following is not written in Delphi?

  1. Skype

  2. Toad

  3. PL/SQL Developer

  4. MySQL

  5. MySQL Administrator


Correct Option: D

Find out the odd one.

  1. Embarcadero

  2. CodeGear

  3. Inprise

  4. Borland

  5. Pascal


Correct Option: E

Which compiler directive controls whether the reserved word 'string' represents a short string or a long string?

  1. $M+/-

  2. $H+/-

  3. $P+/-

  4. $V+/-

  5. $X+/-


Correct Option: B
  1. TObect

  2. TUnknown

  3. IUnknown

  4. TBase

  5. TComponent


Correct Option: A
  1. Stack

  2. Heap

  3. Register

  4. Floppy

  5. Compact Disk


Correct Option: B
  1. TRUE

  2. True using pointer

  3. FALSE

  4. Some times true, some times false.


Correct Option: C
  1. TRUE

  2. FALSE

  3. True with the help of changing the Bidi alignment.

  4. True by setting proper margin value.


Correct Option: B
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